If It Fits, Why Not?

This year I’ve decided to challenge myself in ways that I have never imagined or put off at one time or another and that includes signing up for a continuing education classes in fashion design.  It’s not on the level on a full-fledged undergraduate degree, but the class so far has challenged me, it’s been interesting and fun!  

Some of our class assignments involve discussions of current fashion articles which has led me to browse TONS of fashion news sites and blogs in the past month.  Between the informative fashion business news sites and the 80 zillion “what I wore today” blogs there are many places with tons of advice on what you should and should not wear for your particular body type. I mostly think this is a load of bull!  I am of a mind that if you find something that’s fits well regardless of your shape you should wear it with pride. Why hide assets that you do like? Not all women want to minimize a large bust or full hips, some short women happen to like long dresses (and look good in them!), and I’ve seen some full-figured women rocking a wild all over print.    If you have the confidence to pull off the look and are comfortable in the clothes and skin, why not go for it?!  What do you think about dressing for a body type?

On another note, speaking of both “fit” and “classes”, I completed  a Craftsy class on Fitting your Knits.   The class project sweater (Mesilla) in the photo isn’t my favorite knit pattern that I’ve seen around, but I wanted to go through the steps for the class sake. The fit of this sweater, while not perfect, is better than others I’ve made in the past.    Most times I’m so excited I just want to jump in and start knitting I would barely remember to check the gauge (amateur mistake!).  The body fits  well, but there are too many stitches in the front raglan area.  

The math for fitting knits isn’t difficult at all!  You just have to know your measurements, gauge, and the pattern’s measurements and gauge.    I’m not sure I really needed the class for all that, but it did get me to think more about fitting my knits properly for all future projects.  

 

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-Nizzy

If It Fits, Why Not?

Part-time Perfectionist

There are times where I am knitting/sewing/crafting away at a project and I’ll notice a mistake: A split stitch, a crooked seam, a missed area of paint and I will sometimes let myself think that mistake ruins the whole project.  Surely, if I notice it others will also.  Yes, I am a perfectionist! But that’s not quite something to be proud of. 

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While I was making March 2012’s quilt blocks I tried to get those points and corners to line up and in the end there were a couple that just didn’t line up perfectly.  Do I throw in the towel on the whole project?  Do I spend more time taking it all apart to try to line it up?  In this case, both of these answers should be no.  One small little error does not render a whole project useless.  The inherent function of the block will still be the same.   As crafters/artists/workers/people we should strive to do the best we can, but not at a cost.  Paying attention to detail is a great quality to have, however extreme perfectionism is limiting, inefficient, and most of the time unattainable.

In the future I hope to let my perfectionism drive my need to improve, but not so much so that it hinders my creativity and progress.  I am not a machine.

-Nizzy

Part-time Perfectionist

Thursday’s Three Things

  • So, I’ve figured out the secret to easing the pain of weaving in all of those yarn tails at the end.  Ya ready?   WEAVE IN AS YOU GO.  It’s that simple!  Why didn’t I figure that out sooner?  Somehow I guess weaving in as I go won’t work for this small afghan square.

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  • I finished another two Crafty BOM 2012 quilt blocks.  These two were all about cutting triangles using two different methods.  The first is the  Magic half-square triangle where you create the triangles by sewing around the edges of two layered squares and cutting them open.  In the second, more traditional method you create the triangles by drawing a line on the diagonal of each square, layering two together, sewing a seam on each side and finally cutting down the middle.  I prefered the first method, which seemed to go together much faster, but it was nice to be able to sew a chain of squares together without breaking the thread using the second method.  Anyhow, here are my two finished squares.

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  • I finally got around to purchasing a copy of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion by Elizabeth L. Kline.  I cannot wait to dive in!  First, I need to finish the two other books I’ve started and then I’ll let you know what I think!  Have any of you bloggers checked out this book?
Thursday’s Three Things

Me? Quilting?

In an earlier post I mentioned my visit to a Babylock sewing club.     Three quarters of the way through the class there was “Show and Tell” segment where everyone in the room got a chance to show off something that they made.  One woman showed a bunch of quilt blocks she put together from the free Craftsy 2012 Block of the Month class.  The fabrics, the colors, and the stitching were beautiful and it inspired me to give it a try.  I’ve never quilted before and don’t have the interest now to call myself a quilter, but I’m going to have fun making the blocks!  I may not even bind it after all the blocks are done.

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The first two blocks employed the slash and sew technique:  sew in a strip between two pieces, slash through your square, and sew in another strip between the two new pieces.  Very easy.  Except when things don’t line up.  I had to redo the seams on the Wonky Pound Sign block because my strips didn’t line up.  The very first block I did (Asterisk) isn’t centered and I’m fighting the urge to completely redo the thing.

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I falling in love all over again with my rotary cutter!

-Nizzy

Me? Quilting?